skip to navigation »

Oswald Hafenrichter’s House

Year of construction: 1867

Number of views: 3800

Category: Houses in the Pedestrian Zone

Address: Svobody 2, čp. 9

 
 
 

House No. 9 was one of the three houses which surrounded Cheb Square in the place of the Horse Market. The oldest known owner of the house is Johann Walburger who lived in it during years 1531–1545. The house owner who was the most active in the town administration was Paul Trage who was a councillor of the town of Cheb in the external community of the town council in 1612–1629 and then in 1630–1632 he was a member of the town court of law. The burger house with a timber-framed gable preserved a Gothic character until 1867. The house was entered in the north front face through a pointed portal with a shaped edge into the main room in the front of the ground floor (“Maßhaus”), vaulted by a cross vault to the central pillar. The deep plot of land reaching all the way to the town wall revealed its Middle-Ages origin. The house was largely demolished in 1867 and then rebuilt by the plans of Adam Haberzettl. The builder utilized his favourite style drawing on the Gothic style enriched by a number of Renaissance elements (especially the main cornice). The sizeable face was separated rhythmically by avant-corps with semi-columns joining two floors and crowned by stepped attic gables. The building was divided into two individual house number units during the reconstruction, with No. 8 on the corner of Šlikova and Svobody streets built by Adam and Theresia Kreuzinger. A number of small shops with haberdashery and fabrics, clothing and shoes were located on the ground floor, as well as a laundry and a toy shop with mostly Nuremberg toys (Karl Weichesmüller). Anton Böhringer operated his famous bookstore and Hans Böhringer his antique books store here in the 1920s. The building which formed a whole block was demolished partially in 1939 (No. 8), to allow the modern house of Rudolf Stanka to grow there. A clock and jewellery shop, as well as a bookstore were located on the ground floor after World War II.

Authors of the text: Zbyněk Černý - Karel Halla - Hana Knetlová

 

Comment

Literatura:

Zbyněk Černý - Karel Halla - Hana Knetlová, Que procedit. Historie pěší zóny v Chebu / Geschichte der Fussgängerzone in Eger, Město Cheb 2010, s. 45-49

 

Owners

  • 1531–1545 Johann Walburger
  • 1546–1560 Johann Walburger’s widow
  • 1561–1565 Franz Brunner
  • 1566–1577 Clemens Ludwig
  • 1578–1590 Peter Stobitzer
  • 1591–1595 Peter Stobitzer’s widow
  • 1596 Peter Wilhelm
  • 1597–1610 Peter Wilhelm’s widow
  • 1611–1631 Paul Trager
  • 1632–1637 Paul Trager’s widow
  • 1638–1657 Paul Trager’s guardian
  • 1658–1679 Georg Adam Eberhard
  • 1680–1695 Helene Eberhard
  • 1696–1739 Helene Eberhard’s heirs
  • 1740–1758 Maria Rosina Haintzmann
  • 1868–1893 Oswald and Maria Hafenrichter
  • 1893–1934 Eduard and Maria Lederer and their heirs
  • 1934–1946 Hermine Fischer and Emma Hermine Kaessmann
  • 1946–1949 National administration
  • 1949 Town of Cheb
 

Design

Adam Haberzettl

 

Accessible to the public only during operating hours of the businesses residing here. 

 

Contact Information

Address: Svobody 2, čp. 9

 

Pictures

Damaged memorial of Joseph II, with house No. 9 in the background, around 1921, SOkA Cheb

Damaged memorial of Joseph II, with house No. 9 in the background, around 1921, SOkA Cheb

House No. 9, J. Slavík, 1957, SOkA Cheb

House No. 9, J. Slavík, 1957, SOkA Cheb

swald Hafenrichter’s House 2013

swald Hafenrichter’s House 2013

 
swald Hafenrichter’s House 2013

swald Hafenrichter’s House 2013

swald Hafenrichter’s House 2013

swald Hafenrichter’s House 2013

swald Hafenrichter’s House 2013

swald Hafenrichter’s House 2013

 
swald Hafenrichter’s House 2013

swald Hafenrichter’s House 2013

 

 
Interactive Encyclopaedia of the Town of Cheb

Interactive Encyclopaedia of the Town of Cheb
Overview of Top 200 Historic Sites in Cheb.